ILO (International Labour Organization) Conventions

The ILO is the United Nations international organization responsible for creating and overseeing international labour standards.

The ILO brings together representatives of governments, employers, and workers to shape policies and programmes promoting Decent Work for All. The ILO uses conventions and recommendations to set international standards1. There are eight fundamental (*) conventions.

Goals: Promote and realize standards and rights at work; Create greater opportunities for women and men to decent employment and income; enhance the coverage and effectiveness of social protection for all, and Strengthen tri-partisan and social dialogue2.

Relevant Clauses:

Discrimination

– C111 – Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, (1958)*3

Article 2:

[…] equality of opportunity and treatment in respect of employment and occupation, with a view to eliminating any discrimination in respect thereof.

Freedom of Association/Collective Bargaining

– C087 – Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise*4

Article 2:

Workers and employers…shall have the right to establish and […] join organisations of their own choosing […]

Article 3:

1. Workers’ and employers’ organisations shall have the right to draw up their constitutions […] elect their representatives […] organise their administration and activities and […] programmes.

2. […] public authorities shall refrain from any interference which would restrict […] lawful exercise thereof.

Article 4:

Workers’ and employers’ organisations shall not be liable to be dissolved or suspended by administrative authority.

Article 5:

Workers’ and employers’ organisations […] have the right to establish and join federations and confederations and…to affiliate with international organisations […]

– C098 – Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining*5

Article 1:

[…] adequate protection against acts of anti-union discrimination […]

Article 2:

[…] adequate protection against any acts of interference by each other or each other’s agents or members […]

Forced/Child Labour

– C182 – Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour*6

Article 1:

[…] prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour […]

Article 3:

(a) all forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery […]

(b) the use, procuring or offering of a child for prostitution […] pornography or for pornographic performances;

(c) the use, procuring or offering of a child for illicit activities[…]

(d) work which[…]is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children.

– C138 – concerning Minimum Age for Admission to Employment*7

Article 2:

3. The minimum age specified […]shall not be less than the age of completion of compulsory schooling and, in any case, shall not be less than 15 years.

Article 3:

1. The minimum age for admission to any type of employment or work which […] is likely to jeopardise the health, safety or morals of young persons shall not be less than 18 years.

– C029 – Forced Labour Convention concerning Forced or Compulsory Labour*8

Article 1:

1. Each Member of the International Labour Organisation which ratifies this Convention undertakes to suppress the use of forced or compulsory labour in all its forms…

– C105 – Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957 (No. 105)*9

Article 1:

[…] to suppress and not to make use of any form of forced or compulsory labour […]

– C100 – Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951 (No. 100)*10

Article 2:

1. Each Member shall […] ensure the application to all workers of the principle of equal remuneration for men and women workers for work of equal value.

– P029 –Forced Labour11

Article 1:

[…] to suppress forced or compulsory labour, each Member shall take effective measures to prevent and eliminate its use, to provide to victims protection and access to appropriate and effective remedies, such as compensation, and to sanction the perpetrators of forced or compulsory labour.


  1. ILO (2014): Who we are []
  2. ILO (2014): Mission and Objectives []
  3. ILO (2012): C111 – Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, 1958 (No. 111) []
  4. ILO (2012): C087 – Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention, 1948 (No. 87) []
  5. ILO (2012): C098 – Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 (No. 98). []
  6. ILO (2012): C182 – Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182) []
  7. ILO (2012): C138 – Minimum Age Convention, 1973 (No. 138) []
  8. ILO (2012): C029 Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29) []
  9. ILO (2012): C105 – Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957 (No. 105) []
  10. ILO (2012): C100 – Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951 (No. 100) []
  11. ILO (2014): P029 – Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 []
Cases affected this norm Companies involved directly or indirectly through subsidiaries in cases, affecting this norm Investors investing indirectly (through shareholding) in cases, affecting this norm

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