UniCredit Group

Unicredit Group’s core markets are in italy, Austria and Germany. Unicredit is a market leader in central and eastern europe where it ranks among the top five banks for 11 countries. In 2012 the CEE region accounted for 26.2% of the group’s revenues.

Regarding environmental protection, UniCredit partners with several environmental initiatives including the UN Global Compact, the Carbon Disclosure Project, the UN  Environment Programme’s Finance Initiative (UNEP-FI), and others. Unicredit bank Ag was also one of the first to sign the Equator Principles. UniCredit also claims to “address the particular challenges posed by the nuclear sector” and accordingly made up a “Nuclear Energy Industry Policy”. Yet, this policy doesn’t cover the first step in the nuclear power production: extraction.

UniCredit’s policy on weapons alleges to refrain from financial transactions that involve nuclear weapons and cluster munitions.

The Dirty Profits 3 report shows the financial ties between UniCredit and the selected controversial companies between 2012 and 2014. Further detailed data tables are available to download here.

In Dirty Profits 2 UniCredit was financially tied to a number of the selected controversial companies. Most information is contained within the Dirty profits 2 report, but detailed data tables can be downloaded here.

In Dirty Profits 1, UniCredit ranked fifth in harmful investment transactions with a total of €5.086 billion invested in 23 of the 28 controversial companies investigated in the PROFUNDO report.

For detailed information regarding the companies that UniCredit is invested in, please refer to the PROFUNDO research report links below. The PROFUNDO report, (conducted between 2010 and 2012), analyzes the investments between UniCredit (and many other financial institutes) and controversial companies.

PROFUNDO – Underwritings of Shares and Bonds

PROFUNDO – Loans

PROFUNDO – Management of Shares and Bonds

Direct involvement in criticised cases Shareholding Indirect involvement (through companies or subsidiary companies) in criticised cases
Norms, affected by criticised cases

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